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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
, politico hosts a discussion with bob woodward, author of "the price of politics," and marco rubio. mike allen moderates the discussion. see that live at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3. house democrats filed a discharge petition to force a house vote to extend the bush era tax cuts for middle-class families. the bill has already passed in the senate. next, we hear from nancy pelosi. the course of the election the president made it very clear that he was courting the extension of the middle class tax cut and that everyone, 100% of the american people, would benefit from it. 100% of taxpayers, small businesses, wage earners, and the rest. the republicans are saying that rather than passing that they want to hold it hostage to giving an additional tax cut to people making over $250,000 a year. that's not negotiating. that's hostage taking. so today on the floor of the house the democrats have proposed a discharge petition which if it receives 218 signatures, that's only a couple dozen republicans joining the democrats, would automatically come to the floor and i predict would receive the ov
the privilege and honor to help in his campaign and i have been in san diego with bob, the love and the affection that his constituents have for congressman filner is just really unparalleled. i want to congratulate him for his magnificent win. it was a tough campaign, but he did an unbelievable job and that's because people in his district really knew him and he had provided the level of services that allowed him to be elected now as -- we will call him very soon, mayor filner. joe baca, congressman baca, has been a voice for the poor and underserved during his entire career, not only here in congress but in the california legislature. i was privileged to work with joe on many, many issues, and he has been a consistent voice, both in the california legislature and now here in congress, for protecting low-income families from unfair predatory and credit practices. he has used his seat on the house agricultural committee and house financial services committee to help the most vulnerable americans. he has consistently played a role in raising funding levels for food stamps and nut
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
. that's the furthest thing from the truth. host: bob in silver spring, maryland, republican. caller: how are ya? i don't like it when the democrats all ask for gun restrictions in view of the tragedy. what about restrictions on the first amendment? do you want a balanced approach? should we restrict violent movies and video games by law? maybe in a movie, only three people can get shot, what do you think of that? guest: i am a former journalist. i have great respect for the first amendment and of the right to expression. we want to promote creativity and promote restrictit, so i would not advocate any legislative controls on content. -- we want to promote creativity, not to restrict it. we are talking about the need for parents to be responsible in what they allow their impressionable children to use or to seek. beyond that, i don't see we have much of our role. host: our last call comes from lamont in mansfield, ohio, a democrat. caller: how are you doing? i have more of a comment than a question. i think the problem with the guns does not act to do with legislation or mental check ups.
, martin, the chief staff to governor bob mcdonnell. at the end, roxanne white joining us from colorado. so, their full bios are in the pamphlet on your table. >> first, thank you for the report. it provides a good framework to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% in solvent. we did major reform and now we are in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs will go to 22%. to give you a sense of how far behind the war, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we have a right, we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. it is important to get through the litigation. we are very concerned about medicaid costs. they are about 20% of our budget, growing at a rate of 8% per year. we are very engaged in putting everyone in medicaid in an affordable care collaborative. we believe the exchange offers the opportunity for two things. it was largely supported by small businesses in colorado to help them to be able to afford insurance for their employees. there was a very bipart
says our economic security is at risk if we do not cut down the debt. secretary bob gates said it is in the international security. is that theater? is the national debt and illusion? americans do not think so. today we will start acting. we will start acting and we will do something else -- we will cut taxes. we will defer the tax cut. except for the millionaires, those making over $1 million. we will let those tax rates go back up, which is exactly what nancy pelosi proposed. we will take her proposal. and mr. van hollen says it will not give one a democratic road or something -- for something your leader proposed three months ago. that as political theater, mr. van hollen. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i wish the outgoing chairman of financial services well. this policy did not make the tax proposal that would -- nancy pelosi did not have a tax proposal that would give people earning over $1 million in tax break. no. 2, the proposal the president has put on the table has trillions of dollars of cuts, which is more than in the cuts on the table and would deal with the sequestere
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)